FAQs

General questions about wills and estate planning

Who needs a will?

In most cases, those who own property and are concerned about who will ultimately receive it need a will. Regardless of your age or financial standing, it is important to take charge of deciding who will one day enjoy the property you have accumulated over your lifetime.

What if I have a will that no longer meets my needs?

Your will should be reviewed periodically and updated to reflect changes in your life—births, deaths, financial gains or losses, changes in marital status and your personal goals that can be affected by these changes. Tax law changes may also prompt a review of your plans.

Minor changes can be accomplished with a codicil, a simple amendment to an existing will. More substantial changes may require the drafting of a new will. Whether the changes are minor or extensive, always consult with your attorney when considering a revision, as handwritten changes may completely invalidate your will.

What if I would like to include gifts to charity in my will?

There are a number of ways to combine charitable gifts (also known as bequests) with your estate plans.

Gifts can take the following forms:

A specific amount: You can direct that a particular dollar amount be transferred to one or more charities.

Specific property: You can designate that a certain asset, such as real estate, artwork or other valuables, be used to fund a charitable gift. Such a bequest should be worded carefully, as the assets you own may change over time.

A percentage: A percentage of your estate can be designated for charitable purposes, thus ensuring that your gifts remain in proportion to other bequests.

All or a portion of the residue: You can provide that charitable gifts be made from what is left after all other gifts to loved ones have been fulfilled.

Additionally, you may include provisions for ROLDA through beneficiary designations of living trusts, life insurance proceeds or retirement plan assets that may remain at death.

Is there a way I can enjoy tax savings and other benefits from charitable gifts now?

Yes! There are ways to give that can provide you with income for life or another specified period of time you choose. You can then make a charitable gift of assets that remain when you no longer need the payments. Income tax deductions are allowed for such gifts when completed during your lifetime.

If you fund income gifts with securities that have increased in value over the years, you may reduce and/or delay capital gains tax that would be due had you sold the assets. It can also be possible to receive payments that are free of tax or taxed at lower rates than other income. You also enjoy the satisfaction of making a thoughtful charitable gift in a way that preserves, or perhaps enhances, your financial well-being or that of your loved ones.

Do both spouses need wills?

Yes. Husbands and wives share the same need for making wills, even if much of their property is held jointly.

How much does it cost to make a will?

The fees associated with drafting a will can be quite reasonable, especially when you consider that its purpose is to direct the distribution of property you may have worked a lifetime to accumulate. Taxes and settlement costs that can be avoided with a well-planned will can amount to many times the cost of preparing one.

Why might I need a plan other than a will?

A trust can distribute assets and manage them for elderly people or for younger heirs until they reach a certain age.

Joint ownership arrangements allow you to own property with others. At the end of one owner’s lifetime, the property passes outside of probate to the survivor.

A power of attorney lets you appoint someone to handle your financial affairs if you should be unable to do so. Many people also create a living will, which outlines their health care wishes.

Also review the beneficiary designations of your life insurance policies, IRAs, and other retirement plans, because your will and other plans may not affect their distribution.

What is estate planning?

In its broadest sense, estate planning involves making provisions for the present and future management of the property you accumulate during your lifetime and deciding how you want it distributed when you no longer need it.

How do I begin the estate planning process?

A good place to start is with the “Four Ps”.

  1. List the people you would like to provide for in your plans. You may wish to include charitable interests.

  2. List the property you own and any income it produces. Include investments, real estate, retirement plan funds, and life insurance assets, as well as personal property.

  3. Your plans will begin to take shape as you consider how you wish to use your property to provide for the people on your list. Study your property list carefully, looking for opportunities to match the needs of each person.

  4. List the planners you will need to help you—your attorney, accountant, financial planner, banker and/or others. Consider asking your most trusted advisor to help coordinate the process.

What if I do not make an estate plan?

The state laws where you live will provide one. Your state’s plan cannot:

  • Provide for your heirs according to their needs.

  • Take into account who you would have wanted to be the legal guardian of your minor children.

  • Provide for special friends or charitable interests.

Is a will the only document needed to complete my estate plan?

Not necessarily. There are other ways to distribute property that can act in concert with the terms of your will.

Life Insurance

How do I go about making a life insurance gift?

There are a number of ways to name ROLDA to receive all or part of a life insurance policy you already own. The process can be quite simple and easily changed over time as circumstances change.

You choose to make an immediate gift of a life insurance policy by making ROLDA the irrevocable owner and beneficiary of a policy. You may be entitled to an income tax deduction based on the value of the policy or premiums paid. Check with your advisor for the amount of deduction to which you may be entitled.

What if I still need the life insurance policies that I own?

Consider purchasing a new policy and naming ROLDA as owner and beneficiary. With this type of gift, the premiums you pay may be deductible as charitable gifts each year. In this way, through the payment of affordable annual premiums and reducing your taxes in the process, you arrange for an eventual gift that may be much larger than would be possible using other resources.

Another way to give using life insurance is to purchase a policy to replace other assets given ROLDA. For example, if you make a significant charitable gift of cash or other property, you might utilize the tax savings to purchase a life insurance policy to benefit your heirs at death. The amount you gave to ROLDA may thus be replaced by the amount received by your heirs from the life insurance policy.

What are the benefits to the charitable recipient?

For the charitable recipient (ROLDA), the benefits include:

  • Amount of the gift—With a gift of life insurance, your favorite charitable interests may receive a larger contribution than would be possible if you gave other assets.

  • Avoiding probate—Your life insurance gift can be put to work faster because the charitable recipient receives the proceeds of the policy immediately, without having to wait for the estate to be settled.

  • The full amount—Because life insurance gifts are generally not subject to probate costs, your charitable beneficiary receives all the proceeds you designate.

Who should consider giving life insurance?

Policies originally purchased to provide for needs such as payment of mortgages, educational expenses, or estate taxes may no longer be needed for that purpose.

If your children are grown and financially independent, you have adequate retirement savings, your home is paid for and you no longer anticipate payment of estate taxes, one or more of your life insurance policies may now be “obsolete.” You can make excellent use of such policies by giving them or the proceeds they will eventually generate to one or more charitable interests.

Can you summarize the benefits for donors?

Among the advantages for the donor are the following:

  • Convenience—It is a simple process to change the beneficiary or give complete ownership to a new or existing policy.

  • Tax savings—Significant income, estate, and gift tax savings may be available by effectively planning your gift of a new or existing life insurance policy.

  • Privacy—Unlike a bequest in your will, a life insurance policy gift is not a matter of public record.

  • Flexibility—You can choose whether to name a charitable interest as a beneficiary of a policy you no longer need for its originally intended purpose, such as payment of estate taxes. Or you can purchase a new policy specifically for charitable use.

For women supporters

Why should women be concerned about estate planning?

There are two main reasons—to protect their heirs and to protect their assets.

What do unmarried women need to consider?

Unmarried women need to make sure plans are in place for asset management and other financial concerns later in life. In the absence of a will, trust or other appropriate plans, strangers could be assigned asset management duties, and all or a portion of her assets would be divided among relatives according to state law.

Is estate planning for a woman really any different than estate planning for a man?

Yes. Women, on average, live six years longer than men and should normally plan for a longer period of economic security.

Should estate plans be reviewed when a woman’s marital status changes?

Yes. She may need to make sure the person she named as executor of her will is still her first choice. A careful review of the provisions of her will and the beneficiaries of her life insurance and retirement plans can ensure those named to receive funds still reflect her wishes.

In the case of remarriage, a woman may want to provide for her new husband in her plans while also preserving assets for her children.

What if a woman is married and owns everything jointly with a spouse?

She still should make separate plans. By creating her own comprehensive plan, a woman can often avoid unnecessary tax liability. Joint ownership should be considered as a part of, not a substitute for, a complete estate plan.

Can a woman’s estate plan do more than just distribute property to her loved ones?

Yes. Charitable gifts through a will, trust or other plan can be a practical option for many, because gifts are completed only after one no longer needs the assets. Other giving options that may appeal to women are those that offer secure income payments for life, money management and welcome tax savings. These plans can also provide for a child or grandchild’s education or establish lifelong support for a loved one.

Is it important that both spouses have an estate plan?

Yes. A wife and husband should each have plans that complement each other and take into account any special gifts they would each like to make. Since women are more likely to survive their husbands, they are more likely to bear responsibility for the ultimate disposition of a couple’s assets.

How can a woman continue to support a loved one’s charitable interests?

Many women choose to honor the memory of a husband or other loved one through memorial gifts to charitable organizations and institutions.

Whether carrying on a tradition of giving to a spouse’s favorite charity or leaving a legacy to express her own ideals, memorial gifts can be an important part of a woman’s estate plan.

Legacy society

Are there benefits to being in the ROLDA’s Legacies Society?

The biggest benefit, of course, is that you’ll be helping animals in need for generations to come. But you’ll also receive newsletters and updates from us, and Legacies Society’s Friends get a 10 percent discount on ROLDA online store, along with free shipping. By sharing your intention to give now a gift in your will to ROLDA, up to 5000 US$ will be immediately released to our charity by a Swiss group of donors, which will enable us to buy nutrition food for starving strays, improve our housing facilities for animals in need, expand our shelters, reach more dogs in need of medical emergency aid. Learn more about the Legacy Challenge here https://legacy.rolda.org/rolda-legacy-challenge/.

I live outside Romania. Can I mention ROLDA Romania in my will?

Of course, you can. Please use these details when completing your will:
Fundatia ROLDA
Address: 16 Feroviarilor Street, Bl. C2, ap. 18
800563 Galati, Romania
Registration number: 18416340

I already put ROLDA in my will. Do I need to do anything else?

Yes, please complete the Confidential Bequest Form online here so that we can have a written record of your generosity. It’s a non-binding agreement strictly for our records and ensures that you will become a member of the ROLDA’s Legacies Society.

How do I get in touch with ROLDA team?

Fill in our online form and we’ll send your question to the right person to answer it. At the bottom of this page, you will find a list of phone numbers and postal addresses, please use the most suitable one to get in touch with us!
You can reach the ROLDA founder directly at this phone number 004 0748 903612 (WhatsApp).

Give for income

Who should consider gifts that result in increased income for themselves or others?

Anyone who wants to make charitable gifts while also preserving or enhancing personal financial security would be wise to consider such a gift. Gifts designed to accomplish both of these goals can be made in various amounts and are practical for people of broad ranges of income and wealth levels.

What assets can I use to fund an income gift?

You may fund a gift using a variety of assets—cash, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, real estate or other appropriate property.

How do these gifts work?

Charitable gifts that also provide the donor with income can be made in several ways. One popular option is to make a charitable gift while retaining a fixed income.

With this type of gift, the amount of income you receive is determined at the time you make your gift and remains the same from that point forward. This option is particularly attractive for those who wish to plan on a definite amount of income that will never change.

Another option allows you to make a gift that provides income that varies over time. Income you or a loved one receives from this type of gift will fluctuate each year depending on the performance of the plan’s investments. This option provides an opportunity for growth in income over time.

Are there any tax benefits as a result of such gifts?

Yes. Not only can you enjoy a generous tax deduction, you may also minimize, delay or completely bypass capital gain taxes.

Property (such as securities) that has increased in value while you have owned it may be the smartest choice to fund an income gift. In this case, your income tax deduction is generally calculated using the full fair market value of the property at the time you make the gift. You also avoid paying capital gains tax at the time the donated property is sold.

How much would my payments be?

Payments are usually in the 5%-10% range, depending on your age, the type of gift plan and other factors.

What if I have personal financial obligations to meet, yet still want to make a gift?

A gift that results in additional income for you may allow you to make meaningful gifts and, at the same time, help you achieve personal goals, such as the following:

Educational expenses: If you want to provide funds for your children or grandchildren’s education, a gift that features an income stream may be an attractive and tax-efficient option. You can fund educational needs now or in the future while making an eventual charitable gift and can enjoy immediate tax savings.

Supplement retirement funds: If planning for retirement is high on your list of priorities, an income gift can supplement other retirement plan income while also providing for a charitable gift when you or a survivor no longer need the income.

Pre-retirement planning: If you are not yet retired, simply postpone income payments until you do retire and yhour income may actually be greater at the time when you need it most. Even though you are not yet receiving income, you will still enjoy immediate tax savings.

Take care of loved ones: Do you want to provide financial support for a spouse, parent, child or someone else who depends on you? With a well-planned charitable gift, you can arrange for regular payments that can add to a surviving loved one’s financial security.

How long will I receive payments?

Income can continue for your lifetime and/or the lifetime of whomever else you name. Or, in some cases, you may specify that the payments continue for another period of time you determine, up to 20 years.

When payments are no longer needed or otherwise end, the remaining funds are devoted to charitable use.

Legacy USA

Who should consider gifts that result in increased income for themselves or others?

Anyone who wants to make charitable gifts while also preserving or enhancing personal financial security would be wise to consider such a gift. Gifts designed to accomplish both of these goals can be made in various amounts and are practical for people of broad ranges of income and wealth levels.

What assets can I use to fund an income gift?

You may fund a gift using a variety of assets—cash, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, real estate or other appropriate property.

How do these gifts work?

Charitable gifts that also provide the donor with income can be made in several ways. One popular option is to make a charitable gift while retaining a fixed income.

With this type of gift, the amount of income you receive is determined at the time you make your gift and remains the same from that point forward. This option is particularly attractive for those who wish to plan on a definite amount of income that will never change.

Another option allows you to make a gift that provides income that varies over time. Income you or a loved one receives from this type of gift will fluctuate each year depending on the performance of the plan’s investments. This option provides an opportunity for growth in income over time.

Are there any tax benefits as a result of such gifts?

Yes. Not only can you enjoy a generous tax deduction, you may also minimize, delay or completely bypass capital gain taxes.

Property (such as securities) that has increased in value while you have owned it may be the smartest choice to fund an income gift. In this case, your income tax deduction is generally calculated using the full fair market value of the property at the time you make the gift. You also avoid paying capital gains tax at the time the donated property is sold.

What if a woman is married and owns everything jointly with a spouse?

She still should make separate plans. By creating her own comprehensive plan, a woman can often avoid unnecessary tax liability. Joint ownership should be considered as a part of, not a substitute for, a complete estate plan.

Can a woman’s estate plan do more than just distribute property to her loved ones?

Yes. Charitable gifts through a will, trust or other plan can be a practical option for many, because gifts are completed only after one no longer needs the assets. Other giving options that may appeal to women are those that offer secure income payments for life, money management and welcome tax savings. These plans can also provide for a child or grandchild’s education or establish lifelong support for a loved one.

Is it important that both spouses have an estate plan?

Yes. A wife and husband should each have plans that complement each other and take into account any special gifts they would each like to make. Since women are more likely to survive their husbands, they are more likely to bear responsibility for the ultimate disposition of a couple’s assets.

How can a woman continue to support a loved one’s charitable interests?

Many women choose to honor the memory of a husband or other loved one through memorial gifts to charitable organizations and institutions.

Whether carrying on a tradition of giving to a spouse’s favorite charity or leaving a legacy to express her own ideals, memorial gifts can be an important part of a woman’s estate plan.

Who needs a will?

In most cases, those who own property and are concerned about who will ultimately receive it need a will. Regardless of your age or financial standing, it is important to take charge of deciding who will one day enjoy the property you have accumulated over your lifetime.

What if I have a will that no longer meets my needs?

Your will should be reviewed periodically and updated to reflect changes in your life—births, deaths, financial gains or losses, changes in marital status and your personal goals that can be affected by these changes. Tax law changes may also prompt a review of your plans.

Minor changes can be accomplished with a codicil, a simple amendment to an existing will. More substantial changes may require the drafting of a new will. Whether the changes are minor or extensive, always consult with your attorney when considering a revision, as handwritten changes may completely invalidate your will.

What if I would like to include gifts to charity in my will?

There are a number of ways to combine charitable gifts (also known as bequests) with your estate plans.

Gifts can take the following forms:

A specific amount: You can direct that a particular dollar amount be transferred to one or more charities.

Specific property: You can designate that a certain asset, such as real estate, artwork or other valuables, be used to fund a charitable gift. Such a bequest should be worded carefully, as the assets you own may change over time.

A percentage: A percentage of your estate can be designated for charitable purposes, thus ensuring that your gifts remain in proportion to other bequests.

All or a portion of the residue: You can provide that charitable gifts be made from what is left after all other gifts to loved ones have been fulfilled.

Additionally, you may include provisions for ROLDA through beneficiary designations of living trusts, life insurance proceeds or retirement plan assets that may remain at death.

What if I do not make an estate plan?

The state laws where you live will provide one. Your state’s plan cannot:

  • Provide for your heirs according to their needs.

  • Take into account who you would have wanted to be the legal guardian of your minor children.

  • Provide for special friends or charitable interests.

Is a will the only document needed to complete my estate plan?

Not necessarily. There are other ways to distribute property that can act in concert with the terms of your will.

Is there a way I can enjoy tax savings and other benefits from charitable gifts now?

Yes! There are ways to give that can provide you with income for life or another specified period of time you choose. You can then make a charitable gift of assets that remain when you no longer need the payments. Income tax deductions are allowed for such gifts when completed during your lifetime.

If you fund income gifts with securities that have increased in value over the years, you may reduce and/or delay capital gains tax that would be due had you sold the assets. It can also be possible to receive payments that are free of tax or taxed at lower rates than other income. You also enjoy the satisfaction of making a thoughtful charitable gift in a way that preserves, or perhaps enhances, your financial well-being or that of your loved ones.

What if I still need the life insurance policies that I own?

Consider purchasing a new policy and naming ROLDA as owner and beneficiary. With this type of gift, the premiums you pay may be deductible as charitable gifts each year. In this way, through the payment of affordable annual premiums and reducing your taxes in the process, you arrange for an eventual gift that may be much larger than would be possible using other resources.

Another way to give using life insurance is to purchase a policy to replace other assets given ROLDA. For example, if you make a significant charitable gift of cash or other property, you might utilize the tax savings to purchase a life insurance policy to benefit your heirs at death. The amount you gave to ROLDA may thus be replaced by the amount received by your heirs from the life insurance policy.

What are the benefits to the charitable recipient?

For the charitable recipient (ROLDA), the benefits include:

  • Amount of the gift—With a gift of life insurance, your favorite charitable interests may receive a larger contribution than would be possible if you gave other assets.

  • Avoiding probate—Your life insurance gift can be put to work faster because the charitable recipient receives the proceeds of the policy immediately, without having to wait for the estate to be settled.

  • The full amount—Because life insurance gifts are generally not subject to probate costs, your charitable beneficiary receives all the proceeds you designate.

How much would my payments be?

Payments are usually in the 5%-10% range, depending on your age, the type of gift plan and other factors.

What if I have personal financial obligations to meet, yet still want to make a gift?

A gift that results in additional income for you may allow you to make meaningful gifts and, at the same time, help you achieve personal goals, such as the following:

Educational expenses: If you want to provide funds for your children or grandchildren’s education, a gift that features an income stream may be an attractive and tax-efficient option. You can fund educational needs now or in the future while making an eventual charitable gift and can enjoy immediate tax savings.

Supplement retirement funds: If planning for retirement is high on your list of priorities, an income gift can supplement other retirement plan income while also providing for a charitable gift when you or a survivor no longer need the income.

Pre-retirement planning: If you are not yet retired, simply postpone income payments until you do retire and yhour income may actually be greater at the time when you need it most. Even though you are not yet receiving income, you will still enjoy immediate tax savings.

Take care of loved ones: Do you want to provide financial support for a spouse, parent, child or someone else who depends on you? With a well-planned charitable gift, you can arrange for regular payments that can add to a surviving loved one’s financial security.

How long will I receive payments?

Income can continue for your lifetime and/or the lifetime of whomever else you name. Or, in some cases, you may specify that the payments continue for another period of time you determine, up to 20 years.

When payments are no longer needed or otherwise end, the remaining funds are devoted to charitable use.

Why should women be concerned about estate planning?

There are two main reasons—to protect their heirs and to protect their assets.

What do unmarried women need to consider?

Unmarried women need to make sure plans are in place for asset management and other financial concerns later in life. In the absence of a will, trust or other appropriate plans, strangers could be assigned asset management duties, and all or a portion of her assets would be divided among relatives according to state law.

Is estate planning for a woman really any different than estate planning for a man?

Yes. Women, on average, live six years longer than men and should normally plan for a longer period of economic security.

Should estate plans be reviewed when a woman’s marital status changes?

Yes. She may need to make sure the person she named as executor of her will is still her first choice. A careful review of the provisions of her will and the beneficiaries of her life insurance and retirement plans can ensure those named to receive funds still reflect her wishes.

In the case of remarriage, a woman may want to provide for her new husband in her plans while also preserving assets for her children.

How do I go about making a life insurance gift?

There are a number of ways to name ROLDA to receive all or part of a life insurance policy you already own. The process can be quite simple and easily changed over time as circumstances change.

You choose to make an immediate gift of a life insurance policy by making ROLDA the irrevocable owner and beneficiary of a policy. You may be entitled to an income tax deduction based on the value of the policy or premiums paid. Check with your advisor for the amount of deduction to which you may be entitled.

Do both spouses need wills?

Yes. Husbands and wives share the same need for making wills, even if much of their property is held jointly.

How much does it cost to make a will?

The fees associated with drafting a will can be quite reasonable, especially when you consider that its purpose is to direct the distribution of property you may have worked a lifetime to accumulate. Taxes and settlement costs that can be avoided with a well-planned will can amount to many times the cost of preparing one.

What is estate planning?

In its broadest sense, estate planning involves making provisions for the present and future management of the property you accumulate during your lifetime and deciding how you want it distributed when you no longer need it.

How do I begin the estate planning process?

A good place to start is with the “Four Ps”.

  1. List the people you would like to provide for in your plans. You may wish to include charitable interests.

  2. List the property you own and any income it produces. Include investments, real estate, retirement plan funds, and life insurance assets, as well as personal property.

  3. Your plans will begin to take shape as you consider how you wish to use your property to provide for the people on your list. Study your property list carefully, looking for opportunities to match the needs of each person.

  4. List the planners you will need to help you—your attorney, accountant, financial planner, banker and/or others. Consider asking your most trusted advisor to help coordinate the process.

Why might I need a plan other than a will?

A trust can distribute assets and manage them for elderly people or for younger heirs until they reach a certain age.

Joint ownership arrangements allow you to own property with others. At the end of one owner’s lifetime, the property passes outside of probate to the survivor.

A power of attorney lets you appoint someone to handle your financial affairs if you should be unable to do so. Many people also create a living will, which outlines their health care wishes.

Also review the beneficiary designations of your life insurance policies, IRAs, and other retirement plans, because your will and other plans may not affect their distribution.

Who should consider giving life insurance?

Policies originally purchased to provide for needs such as payment of mortgages, educational expenses, or estate taxes may no longer be needed for that purpose.

If your children are grown and financially independent, you have adequate retirement savings, your home is paid for and you no longer anticipate payment of estate taxes, one or more of your life insurance policies may now be “obsolete.” You can make excellent use of such policies by giving them or the proceeds they will eventually generate to one or more charitable interests.

Can you summarize the benefits for donors?

Among the advantages for the donor are the following:

  • Convenience—It is a simple process to change the beneficiary or give complete ownership to a new or existing policy.

  • Tax savings—Significant income, estate, and gift tax savings may be available by effectively planning your gift of a new or existing life insurance policy.

  • Privacy—Unlike a bequest in your will, a life insurance policy gift is not a matter of public record.

  • Flexibility—You can choose whether to name a charitable interest as a beneficiary of a policy you no longer need for its originally intended purpose, such as payment of estate taxes. Or you can purchase a new policy specifically for charitable use.

Legacy UK

What if I change my mind?

Many people put off making a Will in case they change their minds about legacies and bequests in later years.
However, once you have made a Will, the original contents can be changed or added to by means of a Codicil and will not involve re writing your Will. The Codicil has to be signed and witnessed in the same way as the Will itself, although the witnesses do not have to be the same. The Codicil must be kept with, but not affixed to, your Will.

How can I help relations, friends and charities?

If you would like to leave a bequest to charity but need to ensure that relatives or close friends are well provided for during their lifetimes, there is a simple way to achieve both aims. Your solicitor can explain how someone can receive an income or other benefit from your Estate for their lifetime and then, when this is no longer needed, the remainder can be passed to charity.

What about my funeral arrangements?

As many people never quite get round to discussing funeral arrangements with loved ones, making a Will gives you the opportunity to make your wishes known. Make a note of these to be included in your Will. Strangely enough, the cost of a headstone or memorial is not regarded, by Law, as a funeral expense and it will make matters easier for your Executors if your wishes with regard to a headstone or memorial are also included in your Will.

How much will it cost?

The solicitor's charges will usually depend on the complexity of your affairs and the time taken to draw up your Will. Don't be afraid to ask for an estimate in advance. It may help to obtain estimates from various local firms before deciding which one to use. There may even be a reduced cost if you and your partner make matching Wills that leave the same property and possessions.

Who should make one?

Everyone should make a Will because this is the only way you can be sure that your Estate will be distributed in accordance with your wishes. It is particularly important for parents with young families to make a Will to ensure that their children's needs are safeguarded. It is not enough to guarantee that their financial future is secure, thought must also be given to who will bring them up if you and your partner die. Guardians can be appointed in your Will and your solicitor will help with details of Trust Funds.

How much time is involved in making a Will?

Making a Will usually involves two trips to your solicitor, a first visit to give your instructions and a second appointment to check the document which has been prepared and to sign it.

Who will benefit from my Will?

Write down the full names and addresses of all the people you wish to remember in your Will. Think carefully about precisely which special gifts you wish to make and to whom.

How can I save costs?

To keep costs to a minimum the motto is be prepared! Having all the relevant information to hand will save your solicitor time and save you money. Make a list of all your possessions such as property, furniture and jewelries. Add to this list any shares, insurance certificates or bonds you hold and details of where these documents are stored. Finally, include on the list the name, address and account number of any bank or building society with which you have an account.

Can I draw it up myself?

It is perfectly possible to draw up your own Will but even simple Wills must comply with legal formalities and, if you are not familiar with legal terminology, just one mistake could invalidate the whole document. The best advice we can give is that you use a solicitor to draw up the Will. It is worth the expense to have peace of mind knowing that your wishes cannot be misinterpreted.

Why make a will?

If you have no family and have not made a Will, your entire estate could pass to the Crown and be added to the Treasury's coffers. So while you might want your closest friend to have all your possessions, the law will not agree if there is no Will.

Legacy Australia

If I include ROLDA in my Will do I need to let you know?

It is your decision; however by letting us know about your gift you will help us plan better for the future. If you would like to let us know of your decision to include ROLDA in your Will, please email us at info@rolda.org.au

Can I say where I want my gift to be used?

Legacies provide ROLDA with vital funds for long-term planning and development. Leaving a legacy to a specific type of work or location might mean that we cannot fulfill your wishes if we are no longer doing that specific work or in a specific area in the future. Keeping your gift for general purposes enables ROLDA to use it where the need is the greatest at the time.

Do I need assistance to write a Will?

We suggest you use the services of a solicitor or trustee company to ensure your Will is legally sound. A solicitor can also advise you on matters such as guardians, asset valuation and power of attorney.

What are correct wording for my Will?

Below is the correct wording for including ROLDA in your Will or in a Codicil (a simple addition to your existing Will):
“I give to ROLDA (ABN 38 420 396 060)
1. The rest and residue of my Estate (or)
2. _____ percent of my Estate (or)
3. _____ percent of the residue of my Estate (or)
4. The sum of $ _________
free of all duties and testamentary expenses to ROLDA for its general purposes and I direct that the receipt of that organization shall be sufficient discharge to my executors for this bequest.”

How do I prepare my Will?

The most vital part of having a Will is to ensure it is valid. So it’s a good idea to seek legal advice. Having a solicitor or trustee company assist you in writing your Will can help ensure the required legal processes are followed, in line with your wishes. When writing your Will it’s important that you consider the needs of your family and dependents, and let them know about decisions that affect them – including if you decide to leave a gift to ROLDA.

Can my gift be confidential?

Of course – all information you give to us is strictly confidential. Any information supplied to ROLDA is protected by the Privacy Policy which can be viewed on ROLDA website www.rolda.org.au/privacy-policy/

How can I be sure my money will reach the children who need it?

All donations to ROLDA go directly to where they are needed most, to protect the most abused, sick and vulnerable animals but also the environment (e.g. protect the virgin forests against illegal logging). This is ROLDA’s commitment to our donors and to the animals that need our support. Administration and fundraising costs are kept to an absolute minimum.

When is the right time to write a Will?

If you do not have a Will, it is advisable to write one as soon as possible. It is also important to update your Will when your circumstances change – for example if you get married, have children or buy property.

How do I leave a gift to ROLDA in my Will?

Leaving a gift to ROLDA in your Will is a way that you can make a life-changing difference for tomorrow’s dogs (or other abused animals) and realize your vision for a better world. If you include ROLDA in your Will, it is important to ensure that the wording is legally correct. You may want to talk to your solicitor or trustee, as well as one of ROLDA team member.

Why is having a Will so important?

Everyone should have a Will. It ensures that the distribution of your assets is carried out in the way you want and provides for the people and issues you care about.

Legacy Sweden

Vad kan jag testamentera?

Du kan fördela dina tillgångar hur du vill i ditt testamente. Det kan vara fastigheter, värdepapper, pengar och möbler eller föremål. Du kan också testamentera den kvarlåtenskap som finns kvar i dödsboet när andra arvtagare erhållit angivna belopp eller angivet värdeföremål. Du kan ändra i ditt testamente när du vill, eller skriva ett nytt.

Hur skriver jag ett testamente?

Du som skriver testamentet, tänk på följande:
Specificera den egendom du vill testamentera klart och tydligt. Om möjligt bifoga bilder på t.ex. tavlor, båtar, bilar, smycken och andra fysiska saker.

Ange alltid adress, fastighetsbeteckning, m.m. om du testamenterar en fastighet.
Tänk på att testamentet ska dateras, undertecknas och bevittnas av två personer vid ett och samma tillfälle.
Glöm inte att skriva Association ROLDA Sverige organisationsnummer: 802490-7050).

Varför ska jag skriva ett testamente?

Svensk lag reglerar vad som ska hända med dina tillhörigheter när du går bort, men lagen tar inte hänsyn till dina personliga önskemål. Du kan därför skriva ett testamente för att klargöra hur du vill ha det efter din bortgång.

Om du har bröstarvingar (barn, barnbarn, barnbarnsbarn), har de alltid rätt till hälften av arvet efter dig genom sin laglott. Resten av arvet kan du testamentera till vem du vill och vad du vill. Om du inte har några bröstarvingar tillfaller dina tillgångar Allmänna arvsfonden om du inte skriver ett testamente.

Du som bevittnar testamentet, tänk på följande:


  • Att testatorns namnunderskrift är korrekt samt att han/hon har skrivit testamentet av fri vilja och vid full psykiskt hälsa.

  • Att testamentet har bevittnats och undertecknats vid samma tillfälle som det undertecknats av testatorn.

  • Att vittne var minst 15 år och vid full psykisk hälsa vid undertecknandet.

  • Att vittne ej är testamentstagare.

  • Att vittne ej är släkt med testator.

  • Att vittne vare sig är släkting till testator eller gift med någon av dennes testamentstagare.

  • Att testamentet är korrekt daterat.

  • Att testator har skrivit under på sista sidan och även signerat övriga sidor.

  • Att vittnets namn och personnummer är korrekt angivna.


Det kan exempelvis se ut så här:
”Den egendom som återstår efter att mina bröstarvingar har erhållit sin laglott ska tillfalla Association ROLDA Sverige org.nr 802490-7050.”

Om du känner dig osäker kan du ta hjälp av en sakkunnig, exempelvis en advokat, en begravningsbyrå eller din bank.

När är det dags att skriva testamente?

Många funderar på att skriva ett testamente men känner sig obekväma och tänker att det där gör jag senare. Det är fullt förståeligt. Men det kan vara skönt att få det gjort, så kan man sedan fokusera på att leva för fullt.

Legacy Switzerland

En tant que célibataire, comment puis--je empêcher que des parents éloignés ou l’Etat héritent de mes biens?

Faites un testament. Vous pouvez y déterminer comme héritiers des proches ou des organisations comme l’Association ROLDA Suisse.

Puis-je disposer librement de mes biens dans mon testament?

Oui, pour autant que vous teniez compte des réserves héréditaires légales. Vous ne pouvez déshériter les héritiers au droit d’une réserve héréditaire que dans des cas exceptionnels, par exemple si ceux-ci se sont rendus coupables d’une infraction pénale grave envers vous ou ont grandement failli aux devoirs que la loi leur impose envers vous. S’il n’existe aucun héritier au droit d’une réserve héréditaire, vous pouvez librement disposer de tous vos biens.

Quelle est la différence entre la part d’héritage légale et la réserve héréditaire?

La part d’héritage légale est la partie de l’ensemble de l’héritage qui revient à un héritier selon la loi sur les successions après le partage de l’héritage, si la personne décédée n’a pas réglé sa succession. La réserve héréditaire ne correspond qu’à une partie de cette part d’héritage légale et revient dans tous les cas aux héritiers au droit d’une réserve héréditaire.
Un exemple: Si une personne laisse son épouse et deux enfants, la part d’héritage légale de l’épouse correspond à une moitié de l’héritage, celle des deux enfants ensemble à l’autre moitié de l’héritage, donc à un quart chacun.
La réserve héréditaire de l’épouse survivante correspond à la moitié de la part d’héritage légale, donc à un quart de l’ensemble de l’héritage. La réserve héréditaire des deux enfants correspond aux trois quarts de leur part d’héritage légale, donc pour les deux enfants à trois huitièmes de l’ensemble de l’héritage, ou pour chacun d’entre eux à trois seizièmes. Le testateur peut donc disposer librement de trois huitièmes de l’ensemble de ses biens.

Réserve héréditaire

La réserve héréditaire est la partie de l’héritage que la loi réserve au conjoint, aux descendants et aux parents. Une personne qui attribue ce minimum légal à son conjoint, à ses descendants ou à ses parents, dans le testament ou le pacte successoral, se limite à leur assigner la réserve héréditaire.

Quel document est valable s’il existe un pacte successoral et un testament?

Si le pacte successoral ainsi que le testament respectent les conditions formelles et légales, tous deux sont en principe valables.
Si les deux documents se contredisent au niveau du contenu, ou si par exemple les réserves héréditaires ne sont pas respectées, les héritiers lésés peuvent demander leur réserve héréditaire par une action en réduction ou demander la nullité du testament ou du pacte successoral par une action en nullité et tenter de faire appliquer leurs exigences devant tribunal.
Pour éviter toute contradiction, il est recommandé de rédiger soit un testament, soit un pacte successoral, mais en aucun cas les deux.

Quand un pacte successoral est -il approprié?

Un pacte successoral est souvent conclu en complément au contrat de mariage. Si par exemple les deux époux ont conclu un contrat de mariage sous un régime de communauté et qu’un des conjoints décède, l’ensemble des biens va au conjoint survivant. Les deux conjoints peuvent déterminer dans un pacte successoral qu’une organisation à but non lucratif devienne héritière au décès du second partenaire.
Les pactes successoraux sont souvent conclus avec des héritiers au droit d’une réserve héréditaire qui souhaitent renoncer complètement ou partiellement à leur réserve héréditaire. Le pacte successoral permet aussi de clarifier la situation d’habitation du conjoint survivant par rapport aux enfants, celui-ci recevant à vie l’usufruit de la succession, les enfants ne recevant la maison des parents que comme appelés.

Pacte successoral

Un pacte successoral est un accord entre le testateur et les futurs héritiers qui doit être certifié par un notaire.

Quelles sont les conditions pour qu’un testament soit légalement valable?

Un testament légalement valable doit être rédigé par vous-même et à la main du premier au dernier mot, doit contenir le lieu et la date exacte et comporter votre signature. Les modifications doivent elles aussi être rédigées à la main, datées et signées par vous-même.

Testament

Un testament est la dernière volonté du testateur fixée par écrit. Un testament lui donne l’assurance qu’après sa mort ses biens seront utilisés comme il l’a souhaité. Il rend les choses claires pour les héritiers et permet un partage rapide de la succession. Un testament peut être modifié à tout moment.

Qui est concerné par la réserve héréditaire?

Les personnes au droit d’une réserve héréditaire sont les descendants directs (les enfants, les petits-enfants, les arrière-petits-enfants), l’épouse ou l’époux survivant et, s’il n’y a pas de descendants, les parents. Les époux légalement séparés ou divorcés ne sont plus successibles puisque les biens ont déjà été partagés lors de la séparation de corps ou du divorce.

Puis -je faire bénéficier Association ROLDA Suisse dans mon pacte successoral?

Un pacte successoral, comme un testament, permet de convenir de charges ou de prescriptions de partage.

Le pacte successoral et le testament ont ils la même valeur?

Le pacte successoral comme le testament permettent au testateur de régler librement sa succession dans le cadre légal. Du point de vue du contenu, il n’y a aucune restriction ni pour l’un, ni pour l’autre. Lors de pacte successoral, le testateur a toutefois besoin de l’accord des futurs héritiers, ce qui n’est pas le cas avec un testament.
Le testateur peut modifier son testament en tout temps, un pacte successoral ne peut être modifié ou annulé que par un accord écrit mutuel.

Quelles sont les différences entre un testament et un pacte successoral?

Dans son testament, le testateur décide seul de toute sa fortune. Il peut rédiger et modifier son testament en tout temps, de façon olographe ou devant notaire. Un pacte successoral doit toujours être certifié par un notaire. Le pacte successoral est un accord entre le testateur et les futurs héritiers. Les partenaires contractuels ne peuvent le modifier qu’ensemble. Il offre une sécurité contre un changement d’avis hâtif d’un partenaire

Legacy Norway

Hvordan bruker ROLDA sine arvede midler?

Enkelte har et ønske om å øremerke midler til spesifikke områder av vårt arbeid. Dette er fullt mulig, men det kan være fornuftig at du kontakter oss slik at du kan være sikker på at det/de området/-ene du vil prioritere er områder vi vil ha fokus på i flere år fremover.

Alle gaver vi mottar er like kjærkomne, og vi er takknemlige for alle gaver, store som små. Vårt regnskapet blir hvert år kontrollert av Brønnøysundregistrene.

Hvordan finner jeg en jurist/advokat som kan hjelpe meg?

Advokatforeningen har en god nettjeneste som du finner på følgende link:
advokatenhjelperdeg.no. Søk på finn advokatene i menyen.
Her kan du søke advokater med arv og testamente som arbeidsfelt, i ditt nærområde.

Dersom du ønsker å inkludere ROLDA i ditt testamente, kontakt oss Hege
+479 204 2553 og rolda@rolda.org

Hvem er arvinger etter loven?

Livsarvinger er ditt avkom (dine barn), og de arver i utgangspunktet likt. dør ett barn, går dennes del av arven videre til barnets livsarvinger (dine barnebarn.) Ektefelle arver som beskrevet nedenfor. Det er også innført lovbestemt arverett for samboere på visse vilkår. Alle disse arvinger betegnes legalarvinger, og deres arvelodd (det de arver) kan i testament begrenses til NOK 1 mill. hver. Testator kan også begrense gjenlevende ektefelle/samboers arverett ved testamente som gjøres kjent for ektefelle/samboer mens testator fortsatt lever.

Hvilke formelle krav stilles til et testamente?

De formelle kravene som stilles til et testamente er gitt i arveloven. Et testamente skal være skriftlig og undertegnet av den som testamenterer (testator) og av to myndige personer som etter testators ønske har undertegnet som vitner. Vitnene må ikke være i slekt med eller nærstående til den som er skal arve i testamentet. Vitnenes erklæring bør inneholde at testator opprettet testamentet av egen fri vilje og at hun/han var ved full sans og samling. Et testamente kan tilbakekalles, endres og utfylles ved senere gyldige testamenter. Det er svært viktig at de formelle kravene til et testamente følges ellers blir testamentet ugyldig. Det er derfor vi anbefaler bruk av jurist/advokat.

Hvem arver verdiene etter meg hvis jeg ikke skriver et testamente?

Dersom du ikke oppretter noe testamente er det reglene i arveloven som avgjør hvordan arven fordeles. Dine familiemedlemmer vil arve midlene etter deg. Dersom du ikke har noen arvinger etter reglene i loven, går hele arven til staten.

Hvordan kan jeg gi en gave til ROLDA i mitt testamente?

Hvis du ønsker å testamentere en del av din formue til ROLDA må du opprette et testamente. Det er viktig at du oppgir korrekte opplysninger.
Vi heter: ROLDA GATEHUNDER FRA ROMANIA - OSLO OG OMEGN
Organisasjonsnummer 998 398 495

Arveloven

Arveloven gir klare regler for hvordan arven skal fordeles mellom barn (livsarvinger), gjenlevende ektefelle (herunder samboere på visse vilkår) og øvrige slektninger. Dette er kort det loven beskriver:
• Gjenlevende ektefelle arver ¼ av boet hvis avdøde etterlot seg barn eller barnebarn - minimum 4G (grunnbeløpet i Folketrygden)
• Dersom avdøde ikke hadde barn eller barnebarn arver ektefelle ½ av boet (minimum 6G) . Resten går til foreldre og søsken.
• Dersom avdøde ikke hadde barn, barnebarn, foreldre eller søsken, arver ektefelle alt.
• Hvis ektefellens arverett skal begrenses, må testamentet gjøres kjent for ektefellen før den som testamenterer dør.
• Barn arver normalt 2/3 av boet etter hver av sine foreldre- den såkalte pliktdelen.
• Pliktdelen kan begrenses oppad til kr 1.000.000 for livsarvinger og kr 200.000 for fjernere slektninger hvis det skrives et testamente.
• Dersom avdøde ikke har gjenlevende ektefelle, barn, foreldre eller søsken (eller besteforeldre og deres livsarvinger) arver Staten alt.
Det som ikke kommer inn under pliktdelsarv til barn og/eller ektefeller kan du fritt testamentere til den/de du ønsker – mao alt utover kr 1 mill.. Se arvelovens bestemmelser her LOV 1972-03-03 nr 05: Lov om arv m.m.

Hva kan bestemmes i et testamente?

Når du oppretter et testamente kan du innenfor reglene i arveloven påvirke fordelingen av dine verdier. Du kan for eksempel tilgodese personer som ikke er arvinger etter loven eller du kan tilgodese organisasjoner eller formål du sympatiserer med.

Det er nettoformuen som arves. Det betyr at krav fra eventuelle kreditorer først må dekkes av boet eller ved at arvingene overtar kravene. Ingen har krav på arv før arvelater er død og etterlater seg en nettoformue. I et testamente kan du bestemme hva personer eller andre skal arve. Det kan være et bestemt beløp, en bestemt gjenstand, en andel av din formue eller den resterende del av din formue når pliktarv og annen arv er betalt.

Hva er egentlig et testamente?

Et testamente er et skriftlig dokument som er ment å gi uttrykk for hvordan du ønsker å fordele det du etterlater deg mellom familie og andre. Andre kan her være venner eller organisasjoner og lignende. Du gjør det samtidig lettere for dine etterlatte hvis du fordeler dine eiendeler og skaper klare linjer i et fremtidig arveoppgjør.

Dersom du ønsker å fordele formuen på en annen måte enn det loven bestemmer (som er slektninger eller staten) må det skrives et testamente.

Legacy Holland

Wat doet een executeur?

Een executeur is degene die verantwoordelijk is voor de afwikkeling van de erfenis na je overlijden. Dit kan een vriend of familielid zijn, maar ook een goed doel. Een executeur wordt aangewezen in een testament.

Wat is een codicil?

Een codicil of wilsbeschikking is een handgeschreven, gedagtekend en ondertekend document ter aanvulling van je testament. In een codicil kun je bijvoorbeeld wensen aangaande de uitvaart beschrijven. Ook kun je in een codicil aangeven hoe je wilt dat bepaalde erfstukken verdeeld dienen te worden, zoals sieraden, kunst, meubels, boeken, etc.

Hoe zit het met de belasting op een erfenis?

Als iemand iets erft, wordt daar normaal gesproken belasting over geheven. Dit heet erfbelasting. Goede doelen (met ANBI-status) hoeven echter geen belasting te betalen over een erfdeel of legaat.

Ze zijn volledig vrijgesteld van erfbelasting. Daardoor kunnen goede doelen hun aandeel in een nalatenschap voor de volle 100% inzetten voor hun doelstelling.

Moet ik naar de notaris voor het maken van een testament?

In Nederland is het niet mogelijk een testament te maken zonder tussenkomst van een notaris. Dus ja, je zult naar een notaris moeten gaan voor het maken van een testament.

Dit kan trouwens ook online (bijvoorbeeld op www.nutestament.nl). Het nadeel is dan wel dat je geen persoonlijk advies kunt inwinnen.

Wat is handiger: een vast bedrag of een percentage?

Twijfel je tussen het nalaten van een percentage of een vast bedrag? Dan is een percentage wellicht handiger, omdat het van tevoren moeilijk is in te schatten wat je vermogen bij overlijden zal zijn.

Wat is het verschil tussen legaat en erfstelling?

Een legaat is een bepaling in je testament die aangeeft dat je een vastgesteld geldbedrag of een bepaald goed nalaat aan een door jou gekozen persoon of organisatie. De grootte van het legaat is niet afhankelijk van de totale omvang van de nalatenschap. Je kunt bijvoorbeeld je familie erfgenaam maken en daarnaast een bepaald bedrag of (on)roerend goed als legaat aan een goed doel nalaten. Je kunt meerdere legaten opnemen in je testament.

Een erfstelling is een vastgesteld deel, vaak een percentage, van het bezit dat middels een testament aan erfgenamen wordt toebedeeld. Als alle rechten van anderen (legaten, boedelkosten en overige schulden) van de totale nalatenschap zijn afgetrokken, krijgen de erfgenamen hun erfdeel. Je bezit wordt volgens de bepalingen in je testament verdeeld onder de erfgenamen.

Nalaten aan een goed doel kan via drie manieren:

Je laat (een deel van) je geld, je huis, aandelen of waardevolle spullen na aan het goede doel. Dat heet een legaat.

Je benoemt het goede doel als enig erfgenaam.
Je benoemt het goede doel als mede-erfgenaam. Het goede doel deelt de erfenis dan met je andere erfgenamen.

Hoe regel ik de verdeling van mijn erfenis?

In een testament kun je aangeven wat je wensen zijn over de verdeling van je erfenis. Als je geen testament hebt, wordt je nalatenschap verdeeld volgens het wettelijk erfrecht.

In het erfrecht geldt alleen de juridische relatie met je partner, kinderen en bloedverwanten. Een handige manier om te checken of je een testament nodig heeft is testamenttest.nl.

Ook kun je testen of je huidige testament nog overeenkomt met je wensen.

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Because every animal deserves to be respected!