Hundreds of dogs
like Buck and Hera, were saved
because of kind and generous
people just like you

HOW CAN YOU HELP

Your bequest can be a specific sum, an estate percentage, or what remains of your estate after you have specified gifts to loved ones and covered expenses. Bequests may consist of money, stocks, real estate, and/or personal property such as valuable art or jewelry.

LIVING TRUST

Another option to consider is a living trust. One advantage of a living trust, unlike a will, is that it can become effective immediately upon one’s death, thereby avoiding probate and insuring privacy. Please consult your attorney before finalizing any legal document.
When you include ROLDA in your will or living trust, you are given special recognition unless you wish your gift to remain anonymous.

Your bequest can be a specific sum, an estate percentage, or what remains of your estate after you have specified gifts to loved ones and covered expenses. Bequests may consist of money, stocks, real estate, and/or personal property such as valuable art or jewelry.

Decide what to give
Notes for LGBT Community
What assets you might give?

Legal Name: Romanian League in Defense of Animals
Current address: PO Box 4674 Crofton MD 21114
Tax ID# 32-0176929
Romanian League in Defense of Animals is a 501(c)(3) registered nonprofit.

 

For Outside of the US
Canadians leaving a planned gift to ROLDA will use the same information as members in the U.S. for the Legal Language and Tax ID in a will and other gifts such as bank accounts, insurance policies, etc. You can request information be sent to you by emailing us at rolda@rolda.org

Will or Trust

A simple way to save the animals’ lives for the future

Retirement Assets

Allocate the remainder of your retirement assets and save lives

Life Insurance

This gift will help ROLDA continue its lifesaving work

Year End Giving

A wonderful way to contribute to the work of ROLDA

Closely held stocks

Best way to avoid federal capital gains tax and state income tax

Donate Real Estate

A real estate donation solves many problems and difficulties for both the donor and ROLDA.

Think about it TODAY!

 

Contact us at legacy@rolda.org to receive the informative brochure or the additional help you need to make your choice.
ROLDA US representative, Mary, is happy and honored to get in touch with you. A bequest is a REAL gesture towards a SAFE tomorrow for animals in Romania!

Romanian League in Defense of Animals, Inc. (ROLDA) is registered with the Internal Revenue Service as a 501(c)(3) entity, Tax ID number is: 32-0176929 Contributions to Romanian League in Defense of Animals, Inc. (ROLDA) are tax-deductible. The information on this website is not intended as legal or tax advice. For such advice, please consult an attorney or tax advisor. References to tax rates include federal taxes only and are subject to change. State law may further impact your individual results.

Contact Mary
Phone: 410-570-9505
Email: legacy@rolda.org

FAQs

Who needs a will?

In most cases, those who own property and are concerned about who will ultimately receive it need a will. Regardless of your age or financial standing, it is important to take charge of deciding who will one day enjoy the property you have accumulated over your lifetime.

What if I have a will that no longer meets my needs?

Your will should be reviewed periodically and updated to reflect changes in your life—births, deaths, financial gains or losses, changes in marital status and your personal goals that can be affected by these changes. Tax law changes may also prompt a review of your plans.

Minor changes can be accomplished with a codicil, a simple amendment to an existing will. More substantial changes may require the drafting of a new will. Whether the changes are minor or extensive, always consult with your attorney when considering a revision, as handwritten changes may completely invalidate your will.

What if I would like to include gifts to charity in my will?

There are a number of ways to combine charitable gifts (also known as bequests) with your estate plans.

Gifts can take the following forms:

A specific amount: You can direct that a particular dollar amount be transferred to one or more charities.

Specific property: You can designate that a certain asset, such as real estate, artwork or other valuables, be used to fund a charitable gift. Such a bequest should be worded carefully, as the assets you own may change over time.

A percentage: A percentage of your estate can be designated for charitable purposes, thus ensuring that your gifts remain in proportion to other bequests.

All or a portion of the residue: You can provide that charitable gifts be made from what is left after all other gifts to loved ones have been fulfilled.

Additionally, you may include provisions for ROLDA through beneficiary designations of living trusts, life insurance proceeds or retirement plan assets that may remain at death.

What if I do not make an estate plan?

The state laws where you live will provide one. Your state’s plan cannot:

  • Provide for your heirs according to their needs.

  • Take into account who you would have wanted to be the legal guardian of your minor children.

  • Provide for special friends or charitable interests.

Is a will the only document needed to complete my estate plan?

Not necessarily. There are other ways to distribute property that can act in concert with the terms of your will.

Is there a way I can enjoy tax savings and other benefits from charitable gifts now?

Yes! There are ways to give that can provide you with income for life or another specified period of time you choose. You can then make a charitable gift of assets that remain when you no longer need the payments. Income tax deductions are allowed for such gifts when completed during your lifetime.

If you fund income gifts with securities that have increased in value over the years, you may reduce and/or delay capital gains tax that would be due had you sold the assets. It can also be possible to receive payments that are free of tax or taxed at lower rates than other income. You also enjoy the satisfaction of making a thoughtful charitable gift in a way that preserves, or perhaps enhances, your financial well-being or that of your loved ones.

How do I go about making a life insurance gift?

There are a number of ways to name ROLDA to receive all or part of a life insurance policy you already own. The process can be quite simple and easily changed over time as circumstances change.

You choose to make an immediate gift of a life insurance policy by making ROLDA the irrevocable owner and beneficiary of a policy. You may be entitled to an income tax deduction based on the value of the policy or premiums paid. Check with your advisor for the amount of deduction to which you may be entitled.

Can you summarize the benefits for donors?

Among the advantages for the donor are the following:

  • Convenience—It is a simple process to change the beneficiary or give complete ownership to a new or existing policy.

  • Tax savings—Significant income, estate, and gift tax savings may be available by effectively planning your gift of a new or existing life insurance policy.

  • Privacy—Unlike a bequest in your will, a life insurance policy gift is not a matter of public record.

  • Flexibility—You can choose whether to name a charitable interest as a beneficiary of a policy you no longer need for its originally intended purpose, such as payment of estate taxes. Or you can purchase a new policy specifically for charitable use.

Who should consider gifts that result in increased income for themselves or others?

Anyone who wants to make charitable gifts while also preserving or enhancing personal financial security would be wise to consider such a gift. Gifts designed to accomplish both of these goals can be made in various amounts and are practical for people of broad ranges of income and wealth levels.

How much would my payments be?

Payments are usually in the 5%-10% range, depending on your age, the type of gift plan and other factors.

What assets can I use to fund an income gift?

You may fund a gift using a variety of assets—cash, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, real estate or other appropriate property.

What if I have personal financial obligations to meet, yet still want to make a gift?

A gift that results in additional income for you may allow you to make meaningful gifts and, at the same time, help you achieve personal goals, such as the following:

Educational expenses: If you want to provide funds for your children or grandchildren’s education, a gift that features an income stream may be an attractive and tax-efficient option. You can fund educational needs now or in the future while making an eventual charitable gift and can enjoy immediate tax savings.

Supplement retirement funds: If planning for retirement is high on your list of priorities, an income gift can supplement other retirement plan income while also providing for a charitable gift when you or a survivor no longer need the income.

Pre-retirement planning: If you are not yet retired, simply postpone income payments until you do retire and yhour income may actually be greater at the time when you need it most. Even though you are not yet receiving income, you will still enjoy immediate tax savings.

Take care of loved ones: Do you want to provide financial support for a spouse, parent, child or someone else who depends on you? With a well-planned charitable gift, you can arrange for regular payments that can add to a surviving loved one’s financial security.

Is estate planning for a woman really any different than estate planning for a man?

Yes. Women, on average, live six years longer than men and should normally plan for a longer period of economic security.

Is it important that both spouses have an estate plan?

Yes. A wife and husband should each have plans that complement each other and take into account any special gifts they would each like to make. Since women are more likely to survive their husbands, they are more likely to bear responsibility for the ultimate disposition of a couple’s assets.

Should estate plans be reviewed when a woman’s marital status changes?

Yes. She may need to make sure the person she named as executor of her will is still her first choice. A careful review of the provisions of her will and the beneficiaries of her life insurance and retirement plans can ensure those named to receive funds still reflect her wishes.

In the case of remarriage, a woman may want to provide for her new husband in her plans while also preserving assets for her children.

How can a woman continue to support a loved one’s charitable interests?

Many women choose to honor the memory of a husband or other loved one through memorial gifts to charitable organizations and institutions.

Whether carrying on a tradition of giving to a spouse’s favorite charity or leaving a legacy to express her own ideals, memorial gifts can be an important part of a woman’s estate plan.

Do both spouses need wills?

Yes. Husbands and wives share the same need for making wills, even if much of their property is held jointly.

How much does it cost to make a will?

The fees associated with drafting a will can be quite reasonable, especially when you consider that its purpose is to direct the distribution of property you may have worked a lifetime to accumulate. Taxes and settlement costs that can be avoided with a well-planned will can amount to many times the cost of preparing one.

What is estate planning?

In its broadest sense, estate planning involves making provisions for the present and future management of the property you accumulate during your lifetime and deciding how you want it distributed when you no longer need it.

How do I begin the estate planning process?

A good place to start is with the “Four Ps”.

  1. List the people you would like to provide for in your plans. You may wish to include charitable interests.

  2. List the property you own and any income it produces. Include investments, real estate, retirement plan funds, and life insurance assets, as well as personal property.

  3. Your plans will begin to take shape as you consider how you wish to use your property to provide for the people on your list. Study your property list carefully, looking for opportunities to match the needs of each person.

  4. List the planners you will need to help you—your attorney, accountant, financial planner, banker and/or others. Consider asking your most trusted advisor to help coordinate the process.

Why might I need a plan other than a will?

A trust can distribute assets and manage them for elderly people or for younger heirs until they reach a certain age.

Joint ownership arrangements allow you to own property with others. At the end of one owner’s lifetime, the property passes outside of probate to the survivor.

A power of attorney lets you appoint someone to handle your financial affairs if you should be unable to do so. Many people also create a living will, which outlines their health care wishes.

Also review the beneficiary designations of your life insurance policies, IRAs, and other retirement plans, because your will and other plans may not affect their distribution.

Who should consider giving life insurance?

Policies originally purchased to provide for needs such as payment of mortgages, educational expenses, or estate taxes may no longer be needed for that purpose.

If your children are grown and financially independent, you have adequate retirement savings, your home is paid for and you no longer anticipate payment of estate taxes, one or more of your life insurance policies may now be “obsolete.” You can make excellent use of such policies by giving them or the proceeds they will eventually generate to one or more charitable interests.

What if I still need the life insurance policies that I own?

Consider purchasing a new policy and naming ROLDA as owner and beneficiary. With this type of gift, the premiums you pay may be deductible as charitable gifts each year. In this way, through the payment of affordable annual premiums and reducing your taxes in the process, you arrange for an eventual gift that may be much larger than would be possible using other resources.

Another way to give using life insurance is to purchase a policy to replace other assets given ROLDA. For example, if you make a significant charitable gift of cash or other property, you might utilize the tax savings to purchase a life insurance policy to benefit your heirs at death. The amount you gave to ROLDA may thus be replaced by the amount received by your heirs from the life insurance policy.

What are the benefits to the charitable recipient?

For the charitable recipient (ROLDA), the benefits include:

  • Amount of the gift—With a gift of life insurance, your favorite charitable interests may receive a larger contribution than would be possible if you gave other assets.

  • Avoiding probate—Your life insurance gift can be put to work faster because the charitable recipient receives the proceeds of the policy immediately, without having to wait for the estate to be settled.

  • The full amount—Because life insurance gifts are generally not subject to probate costs, your charitable beneficiary receives all the proceeds you designate.

How do these gifts work?

Charitable gifts that also provide the donor with income can be made in several ways. One popular option is to make a charitable gift while retaining a fixed income.

With this type of gift, the amount of income you receive is determined at the time you make your gift and remains the same from that point forward. This option is particularly attractive for those who wish to plan on a definite amount of income that will never change.

Another option allows you to make a gift that provides income that varies over time. Income you or a loved one receives from this type of gift will fluctuate each year depending on the performance of the plan’s investments. This option provides an opportunity for growth in income over time.

How long will I receive payments?

Income can continue for your lifetime and/or the lifetime of whomever else you name. Or, in some cases, you may specify that the payments continue for another period of time you determine, up to 20 years.

When payments are no longer needed or otherwise end, the remaining funds are devoted to charitable use.

Are there any tax benefits as a result of such gifts?

Yes. Not only can you enjoy a generous tax deduction, you may also minimize, delay or completely bypass capital gain taxes.

Property (such as securities) that has increased in value while you have owned it may be the smartest choice to fund an income gift. In this case, your income tax deduction is generally calculated using the full fair market value of the property at the time you make the gift. You also avoid paying capital gains tax at the time the donated property is sold.

Why should women be concerned about estate planning?

There are two main reasons—to protect their heirs and to protect their assets.

What if a woman is married and owns everything jointly with a spouse?

She still should make separate plans. By creating her own comprehensive plan, a woman can often avoid unnecessary tax liability. Joint ownership should be considered as a part of, not a substitute for, a complete estate plan.

What do unmarried women need to consider?

Unmarried women need to make sure plans are in place for asset management and other financial concerns later in life. In the absence of a will, trust or other appropriate plans, strangers could be assigned asset management duties, and all or a portion of her assets would be divided among relatives according to state law.

Can a woman’s estate plan do more than just distribute property to her loved ones?

Yes. Charitable gifts through a will, trust or other plan can be a practical option for many, because gifts are completed only after one no longer needs the assets. Other giving options that may appeal to women are those that offer secure income payments for life, money management and welcome tax savings. These plans can also provide for a child or grandchild’s education or establish lifelong support for a loved one.
Let Us Know Your Plan

 

We understand that how you plan to allocate your wealth is a private matter. However, if you wish, you can use this form to let us know of your intention to leave a legacy to the most neglected homeless animals from Europe, through us. The information you provide in this form is for our knowledge only and is in no way a binding commitment on your part. It informs us of your current intention and allows us to respond appropriately.
Please be assured that your reply will be treated with the utmost confidentiality.

My Plan